Archive | June 23, 2016

Massive Tornado Leaves 78 Dead and 500 Injured in East China

A tornado, hail storms and driving rain killed at least 78 people and injured some 500 people 200 of them critically in eastern China on Thursday June 23rd.

Seen on images from local media the storm flattened wide swaths of structures including homes, business and stripping trees from their routes.

The storm struck mid-afternoon near Yancheng city, a few hours’ drive north of China’s commercial capital, Shanghai, the Ministry of Civil Affairs said.

At the time of the storm a violent rotating super cell was seen on Visible satellite imagery.

 

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Plus the seasonal rainy season front was still dominating the region combined with an abundance of upper level support. Where this storm took place in the upper levels was the base of a short wave trough with a Jet Max well over 120kts overhead around 300mb. In short this mean plenty of support to get this storm rotating and supplying it with sufficient outflow and inflow.

The storm came with little warning as tornadoes are not very common in China and adequate warning systems are not in place for this type of event. The initial images of the tornado show it may have not been a massive F4 to F5 twister but a smaller one in a area that was by no means built for these type of winds.

Power and communications are down in the worst hit areas, Beijing has dispatched relief supplies including 1,000 tents to help those who have been left homeless in the Beijing suburb.

Mean while the rainy season front has also been bringing torrential rainfall across China and Japan this past week leaving at least 22 dead due to floods in China and 6 dead in Japan with another 22 missing following wide spread rainfall topping 600mm in some areas.

 

 

 

Since last Saturday Southern China has been pounded by these heavy rains forcing thousands to evacuate their homes. In Hunan province a dam broke in the town of Liye prompting a swift evacuation of 18,500 people on Monday.

In Xingyi City Guizhou eight people became trapped in a coal mine when the tunnels became flooded in rising waters.

In a separate instance search and rescue operations for seven miners missing after a landslide in south China’s Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region continued into a second day on Tuesday.

 

According to the Xinhue news agency the storms have damaged or collapsed 10,500 homes across southern China this past week.  This could also be one of the first billion dollar disasters of 2016 topping 1.1 billion dollars according to the same news agency.

 

Each year the rainy season brings floods to the region but this year coming off the El Nino last year and the incoming summer season we have been seeing a extra strong rainy season in China.

 

The question for some is what is the rainy season?

 

In the episode above of Westpacwx 101 we discuss the rainy season.

There are a few tips to remember if you are in any of the places that get this annual drencher. Every day ideas that you should keep in mind before heading out and about.

 

Tips for the Rainy Season

Tips for the Rainy Season

Lastly I do want to note the rainy season is all apart of a bigger process with the North East and South West Monsoons. The video below breaks down what both of them are and how they impact the seasons across East Asia and the Western Pacific.

Its not all gloom though in the rainy season, of of the symbols of the time is the Hydrangea, a flower that blooms in June and July during the peak of the wet season in Japan.

Tropical Depressions forms near the Philippines, Possible TS by Friday

Its been an extremely slow start to the western pacific typhoon season with it already being late June and no named storm systems forming in the Western Pacific to date. That could change soon though with the announcent of a tropical depression in the south China sea according ot the Japan Meteorological agency. The forecast at this time takes the storm north west towards southern China or Vietnam with it becoming a tropical depression sometime on Friday.


Conditions in the south china sea are favorable for further deelopent of this storm. At least ot a tropical storm intensity, when this happens it will named Nepartak by the Japan Meteorological agency.

Even as a tropical storm this area of convection will be able to pull ample moisture in from the south west monsoon triggering the threat of flooding in the western Philippines, Vietnam and Haian as it tracks north.

 

Daily update- Thursday, June 23, 2016

NWPAC outlook, 23 JUN

NWPAC outlook, 23 JUN

Stormy weather settles in across parts of the north region as the central region sees a much-deserved break from the widespread rainfall. The south region and the tropics are sharing the news today as everyone in Southeast Asia is watching the development of a tropical ‘thingie’ in the South China Sea.

 NORTH

Méiyǔ moisture and energy continue to roll across parts of the north region, primarily affecting the southern and eastern locales. Clouds and patches of rain are likely from eastern China, Korea, and Japan as a stalled frontal system undulates over the general area. Another weak storm system is moving into the region from the north, but it’s not going to make it very far to the south as it stirs up general cloudiness and scattered showers in Mongolia, northern China, and southeastern Russia. The biggest news over the past 24 hours may very well be the huge temperature swing in central China, whereas highs reached near 40C (104F) yesterday, today’s high temperature will struggle to reach 24C (75F) as the clouds and rain hold back the intense summer sunshine.

City

High/Low

C

High/Low

F

Conditions

Ulaanbaatar

20

6 68 43

Scattered showers likely

Vladivostok

17

12 63 54

Scattered showers likely

Beijing

34

21 93 70

Partly cloudy

Seoul

31

21 88 70

Partly cloudy

Tokyo

25

21 77 70

Periods of rain

Xi’an

24

19 75 66

Periods of rain

Shanghai

32

27 90 81

Thunderstorms possible

 

CENTRAL

Although scattered clouds and showers will pop up at the peak of afternoon heating today, the widespread rainfall and flooding threat is diminishing across the central region for the time being. There will be a chance for a stray showers or thunderstorms as temperatures climb to seasonal summertime highs. All the ample moisture needs is a bit of a lift to generate the rain, and the afternoon sun will be all too happy to oblige.

City

High/Low

C

High/Low

F

Conditions

Kunming

24

17 75 63

Scattered thunderstorms possible

Hong Kong

33

28 91 82

Mostly fair

Taipei

34

27 93 81

Thunderstorms possible

Naha

31

27 88 81

Scattered thunderstorms possible

Hanoi

33

26 91 79

Partly cloudy

 

SOUTH

The south region is sharing the news with the tropics today, and will likely do so for the next several days, as 96W INVEST gets cranked up in the South China Sea. Clouds and showers associated with this developing system will affect parts of the Philippines and Vietnam, as it gets better organized and contracts a bit over the next 48 hours. I’ll have more on this developing situation in the TROPICS section of this report. Elsewhere, general tropical moisture and cloudiness will be in place over the entire region, where afternoon clouds and thunderstorms will pop up and make things a bit wetter and cooler at the peak of afternoon heating.

City

High/Low

C

High/Low

F

Conditions

Siem Reap

31

25 88 77

Thunderstorms possible

Ho Chi Minh

29

24 84 75

Thunderstorms possible

Manila

32

26 90 79

Thunderstorms possible

Davao City

32

24 90 75

Scattered thunderstorms possible

Brunei

31

24 88 75

Mostly cloudy

Singapore

32

27 90 81

Scattered thunderstorms possible

 

TROPICS

The tropics have been showing gradual signs of life over the past couple of weeks, and especially over the past 5 days, as waves of energy get a little stronger with each passing day. Finally, after a long season of ‘boredom’, as we weather-watchers refer to it, we have a bona-fide system in the early stages of development in the South China Sea:

96W INVEST

96W INVEST, 23 JUN, 0800PST

96W INVEST, 23 JUN, 0800PST

At 6:00 am PST. The NRL placed the center of the newly-developing 96W INVEST near 12.2N, 118.5E, or about 185km (115mi) WNW of Coron, Palawan, Philippines. The system is drifting to the NW as it slowly gets better organized. Long-range computer forecast models have been rather consistent on the general development and track of this system for the past 3 days. However, the GFS model has backed off of the potential for typhoon development, and rather, is showing more of a monsoon gyre developing in the South China Sea, that will drift slowly in the general direction of the Vietnam/China border. At this time, it’s still too early to say how this will pan out, but it is safe to say that many locations in the south region, and especially southeastern China and northern Vietnam, need to stay alerted to developments of this system.

Elsewhere in the tropics, general convergence is strong over the region, and we may very well see a significant uptick in activity now that we are entering the prime formation period of the season. Otherwise, most locations will see a daily dose of afternoon showers and thunderstorms as the deep moisture gets lifted up into the cooler climes of the atmosphere by the latent heat over the region.

City

High/Low

C

High/Low

F

Conditions

Guam

32

27 90 81

Thunderstorms possible

Yap

31

26 88 79

Thunderstorms possible

Palau

31

26 88 79

Scattered thunderstorms possible

Chuuk

31

26 88 79

Thunderstorms possible

Pohnpei

31

24 88 75

Thunderstorms possible

Majuro

30

27 86 81

Scattered thunderstorms possible

Wake

31

27 88 81

Scattered thunderstorms possible

Have a thoughtful Thursday!

Courtesy: CIMSS, Tropical Tidbits, Intellicast, WUnderground.com, N.R.L., RAMMB-NOAA

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